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Certification

The Administration issues the following certificates:

  • Certificate of Registry (CoR)
  • Continuous Synopsis Record (CSR)
  • Minimum Safe Manning Document (MSMD)
  • Ship Radio Communication License (SRCL)
  • Safety Certificates
  • Transcript of Registry (ToR)
  • LRIT Conformance Test Report
  • Changes to Registry particulars and Ship particulars
  • Bunkers, CLC, Wreck Removal Civil Liability Certificates
  • DMLC Part I

Merchant ships (above 500 GT)

All the Recognized Organizations are authorized to issue all other statutory certificates including the Maritime Labour Certificate and to conduct the surveys associated with them.

The Maritime Labour Convention (MLC) requires that each ship over 500 GT is issued with a Maritime Labour Certificate. These certificates are in three parts:

  1. The Maritime Labour Certificate. This is the fundamental certificate and will be issued by one of the recognized organisations after the ship inspection.
  2. The Declaration of Maritime Labour Compliance Part I (DMLC Part I). This is a statement of the Antigua and Barbuda national requirements and is issued by ADOMS as the Administration. One is required for each ship. Click here for the text of this document. When an individual ship copy is required, this can be issued immediately by contacting either our office in Oldenburg or the headquarters in St. John’s.
  3. The Declaration of Maritime Labour Compliance Part II (DMLC Part II). This is the statement completed by the shipowner which sets out in brief terms the ways in which he is meeting the standards in the DMLC Part I. Click here for a copy of this form. Each owner must prepare their own DMLC Part II.

MLC Certification Procedures

The process of certification requires four simple steps:

  1. Consulting the ILO Circular 2016-001 (Maritime Labour Convention 2006 Guidance), the Owner examines his current systems and procedures against the requirements set out there and in the regulations.
  2. Having analysed the existing systems and procedures against the requirements in the DMLC Part I the shipowner takes steps to close any gaps and ensure that the procedures and systems in place ensure compliance with the DMLC Part I.
  3. Having closed any gaps, the shipowner completes the DMLC Part II setting out the procedures and systems that ensure the standards in the DMLC Part I are met.
  4. When the DMLC part II is complete the shipowner asks the Administration for a final DMLC Part I and applies to an RO for certification under the Convention. The RO will ask for copies of the Part I and the Part II and any supporting documentation which they will review ashore. When the review is satisfactorily completed the RO will arrange attendance on board to complete the inspection and verify compliance on board the ship after which the certificate can be issued.

Merchant ships (under 500 GT) must comply with one of the certification options:

  1. For vessels under 24 metres in length – compliance with the Code of Safety for Small Commercial Vessels.
  2. For vessels over 24 metres in length but under 500 GT – compliance with the Code of Safety for Caribbean Cargo Ships.

Commercial yachts must comply with one of two certification options:

  1. For yachts under 24 metres in length – compliance with the “Small Commercial Vessel and Pilot Boat Code”.
  2. For yachts over 24 metres in length – compliance with the “Red Ensign Group Yacht Code Part A&B”.

Additionally:

  1. Yachts of over 500 GT must be classed with one of our Recognized Organizations
  2. Yachts over 24 metres (loadline length) must have an International Loadline certificate;
  3. New Yachts over 200 GT and yachts under 200 GT carrying more than 10 persons need an International Sewage Pollution Prevention certificate
  4. Yachts over 300 GT need a Cargo Ship Safety Radio certificate,
  5. Yachts over 400 GT need to have an International Oil Pollution Prevention certificate (IOPP Certificate), and an International Air Pollution Prevention certificate (IAPP) .
  6. Yachts over 500 GT need a Cargo Ship Safety Construction certificate, a Cargo Ship Safety Equipment certificate, an International Safety Management certificate, and an International Ship Security certificate.

Pleasure yachts

For larger pleasure yachts compliance with some of the international conventions may be required.

  1. New Yachts over 200 GT and yachts under 200 GT carrying more than 10 persons need an International Sewage Pollution Prevention certificate
  2. Yachts over 400 GT need to have an International Oil Pollution Prevention certificate (IOPP Certificate), and an International Air Pollution Prevention certificate (IAPP).